Riese Muller Tinker Vario is a great choice for a compact daily

first_imgSource: Charge Forward A few weeks ago, I traveled out to Long Beach, California for a work-related trip. I had never been to California (I am from Tennessee), so I was excited to see another side of the country. While I was there, I was loaned a Riese & Muller Tinker Vario by a friend of a friend to travel around the city. more…The post Riese & Muller Tinker Vario is a great choice for a compact daily commuter e-bike appeared first on Electrek.last_img


Dozens of new EVs on display at Geneva auto show

first_imgThe Geneva International Motor Show may have lost some of its former glamor – several major brands are not attending this year – but it remains a good place to get a feel for the state of the European auto industry. And the Europeans are talking electrification – the New York Times caught the electric vibe, reporting that “range is the new horsepower [and] sustainability is the new status symbol.”There are dozens of new electric cars on display at the show, which continues through March 17, and not all are whimsical concept cars – many of these vehicles are actually slated to go on sale in the next couple of years.Polestar, Volvo’s electric performance sub-brand, is displaying the Polestar 2, an “avant-garde 5-door fastback” with all-wheel drive, 300 kW of power, 660 Nm of torque, an estimated range of 275 miles, and a 0-100 km/h time of less than five seconds. A US version of the Polestar 2 is to go on sale early next year in California and Washington State.Porsche is showing off its Taycan EV, which will have “up to 600 hp” of power and 310 miles of range. This “lively young horse” is expected to be available in the US by the end of 2019, and the company claims to have already sold out the first year’s production.Audi, whose new e-tron crossover is supposed to go on sale in Europe any day now, showed only EVs and hybrids at the show.Volkswagen, which is converting several European plants to EV production, also had some upcoming plug-in models on display. “2019 will be a decisive year for electromobility,” said CEO Herbert Diess. Source: Electric Vehicles Magazine Renault has been running loads of ads for its Zoe EV, pushing a lease arrangement that includes a “battery rental” fee. “Even if the price of the cars is higher, the amount to finance from a customer’s perspective is not that much more,” Renault Senior VP Gilles Normand said. (However, Renault is also pushing its new gas-powered Clio, which is similar to the Zoe and sells for much less.)Suppliers are also feeling the electric buzz. “The whole business case is changing for all of us,” said Chris Delaney, Goodyear’s European chief, sitting in a self-driving electric shuttle van equipped with specialized Goodyear tires. EVs account for only 5 percent of Goodyear’s current sales, Delaney said, but 40 percent of new business from manufacturers. Electric cars pose a design challenge for tire makers, he told the Times, as their high weight and fast acceleration require a more robust tire.The big elephant that isn’t in the room is Tesla, which dominates the EV market, but skipped this year’s show. As the Times’ Jack Ewing writes, “it remains to be seen whether the entrenched carmakers can generate the same energized fan base…Despite all of Tesla’s problems, Mr. Musk commands widespread respect in the industry for transforming the image of electric cars from nerdy science projects to desirable performance vehicles.”Porsche’s Detlev von Platen concurred, saying, “Tesla did a lot to build up the market for electric cars. We have a lot of respect for what they accomplished. They’re a reference for us.” America’s Big Three are nowhere to be seen in Geneva – GM has pulled out of Europe altogether, and currently offers only one electrified vehicle, the Chevy Bolt, which seems to be marked for extinction in Europe. Ford has been talking about electrifying its blockbuster F-150 pickup truck, but will soon be offering no electrified vehicles in the US.While the Times and others celebrate the number of EVs on view in Geneva, a healthy dose of skepticism is in order. Sales of gas-guzzling SUVs are on the rise in Europe, and the Geneva show is an island of future EVs in a sea of existing vehicles that are burning more oil every year. In Switzerland, the market share of 4x4s has grown from 25% in 2008 to over 48% in 2018. Consumers’ love affair with SUVs has derailed the country’s efforts to reduce carbon emissions, which have actually increased over the past two years.Although Switzerland has no domestic automakers, the auto importers are powerful defenders of the ICE, both in politics and in the press. A magazine-length promo piece for the Geneva show mentioned only one EV (the Audi e-tron) and featured a list of “myths about the auto industry.” Myth #1 is that diesel is dead. Irony department: Geneva is one of many European cities considering a plan to ban diesels from the city center. Myth #2 is that “EVs are the savior.” While conceding that “EVs are the future,” the auto show’s spokesman writes that “ICE engines will dominate for many years.” Source: New York Timeslast_img read more


Ecobee smart thermostats w HomeKit from 120 LED light bulbs and more

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Today only, Woot offers the ecobee3 lite Smart Thermostat for $119.99. Regularly $169, today’s deal is at least $30 off the current price at other retailers. ecobee3 lite offers a slimmed down version of the more feature-laden ecobee4, which is also on sale for $179.99 (Reg. $199+). That said, it still delivers HomeKit control, automatic scheduling and more. It also works with popular services like Alexa, Assistant and SmartThings. Free shipping is available for Prime members; otherwise a $6 delivery fee applies. ecobee’s entire lineup has 4+ star ratings at Amazon. More below. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://youtu.be/WdPfw3XWyJQThe post Ecobee smart thermostats w/ HomeKit from $120, LED light bulbs, and more in today’s Green Deals appeared first on Electrek.last_img read more


There Is No FCPA News Today

first_imgReally, there isn’t!There is nothing in the FCPA space today particularly newsworthy warranting your attention. Sure, I could have drawn compliance lessons from the sun rising this morning or discussed the compliance lessons of the NBA finals, but really who cares. (Well, actually my college assistant basketball coach Nick Nurse is the head coach of the Toronto Raptors, so I care).I have written about the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act or related topics on a near daily basis for approximately 10 years. Thus, this day was inevitable. To be sure, I was on the brink of publishing a post like this a few other times, but then something happened. However, not today.Seriously, despite running an FCPA website on a daily basis, I sometimes wonder whether daily FCPA content is a good thing. Just like I wonder whether 24-7 news is a good thing.In any event, I am guessing something might happen tomorrow, so please check back.last_img read more


West Fertilizer Explosion Lawsuits Coming

first_imgNot a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Password Remember me The death and destruction caused by the explosion at the West Fertilizer Plant is likely to cost the owners of the plant, its insurance carriers and the makers and operators of the equipment storing the anhydrous ammonia hundreds of millions of dollars in legal compensatory damages, according to lawyers who are following the case closely. The first lawsuits are expected to be filed next week . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.center_img Username Lost your password?last_img read more


Mergermarket Expert TX MA Market in Real Danger of Developing Congestion or

first_img Lost your password? Remember me Password The Texas market has seen 15 consecutive quarters with about 200 or more deals. “Before the third quarter of 2013, 200 deals was the high water mark. Since then, 200 deals has been the floor,” says Mergermarket M&A analyst Chad Watt. “We’ve had so many deals completed [during the past couple years] that the market may need a period to digest it all. “There’s a real danger of developing M&A congestion or heartburn . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.center_img Username Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img read more


Punching A Hole – In Their world

first_imgby, Dr. Bill ThomasTweet11Share35Share5Email51 SharesThe Anti-Aging perspective wields tremendous influence over our culture. If you are over 50 and you look at yourself in the mirror the first thought that comes into your mind is most likely related to the anti-aging worldview. The idealization of youth is ubiquitous so it is hardly surprising that we would find it between our own ears as well.Some people, of course, go much deeper into the world of anti-aging than momentary worries about crow’s feet and graying hair. Women, in particular, are strongly encouraged to eliminate or at least disguise the signs of normal human aging. Wherever there is worry, insecurity and fear, we also find people and companies who are eager to exploit those emotions for their own gain. These are the merchants of fear and they never seem to run short of the next great “hope in a bottle” that will defeat aging forever– only $59.99 for a limited time only!Traveling in my usual circles I don’t often encounter people who make their living provoking fears about aging. Recently however, one such merchant of fear did catch my attention. He is an MD and his practice seems to consist entirely of promoting and providing his patients with “aesthetic medicine.” I took a close look at his website and felt a wave of revulsion sweep over me. It struck me as a combination of flagrant fear-mongering and cheap commercialization. Then I saw a picture of the doctor in question– male, officious and, it seemed to me, he looked quite old.Now around these parts we accept aging as a virtue, as a time of growth and development so saying that someone is old is not perjorative. Indeed, elders are viewed with respect here at ChangingAging.org. That’s when it hit me this old-looking doctor was, essentially, preying upon the fears of young women to sell them treatments that do not work.How can I say that they don’t work? Easy– look at the picture of the guy who is selling them. If his nostrums actually worked, he would be using them himself and he would look as young as the models in his advertisements!I reached out and advised this doctor to do just that.He took offense. He deemed my comments on his aging to be entirely out of bounds even as he freely advised women that they needed his services if they were going to hold back the terrible ravages of their own aging.I wrote to him:“We are both old people. Is it not wise for us to be kind for ourselves? Embrace your age!”Ashton Applewhite got involved in the back and forth and offered these wise words:“Beauty and aging co-exist. And if you’re not aging, you’re dead.”I reminded this doctor that:“My pointing out that you look old is not an insult! It’s a compliment. You and I are getting older every day. Enjoy!”This exchange seemed to kind of blow his mind. I honestly believe that he did not know how to deal with a positive view of aging. The idea that aging could be a good and honorable thing also represented a clear threat to him and his business. If he came to embrace his own aging, how would he be able to continue flogging his anti-aging potions to emotionally vulnerable people?And yet, every single day this anti-aging doctor and I both wake up— one day older.The day will come when he will no longer be able to credibly espouse the bunkum of the day, when his young, fearful patients will be repulsed by his flabby, wrinkled skin and he will know the truth. On that day, we will be here, journeying into our own old age, and he will come to our door and find it standing open. And he will be invited inside, invited to join us all on a shared voyage of discovery.Related PostsMy Evening With Aubrey de GreyInternational anti-aging crusader Aubrey de Grey, who hopes to “cure aging” within our lifetime, spoke in Baltimore this week and even took time to share a few beers with the locals, including yours truly. I’d like to think of ChangingAging.org as the preeminent pro-aging blog so it was a great…A Critical Direction for AgingWe must consider the concept of direction as we decide the next steps to take in order to disrupt aging. How should we move forward, given a new political climate?Gero-Punk DharmaI have a recurring memory of meeting for an interview with one of my spiritual teachers.  How many years ago did this meeting take place? I think several, perhaps even a decade has passed.  I was struggling with memories around personal and family wounds over-taking me during my contemplation and…Tweet11Share35Share5Email51 SharesTags: Ageism antiaging botox DisruptAginglast_img read more


Syphilis and gonorrhea on the rise in England

first_imgBy Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDJun 6 2018Both sexually transmitted infections (STIs), syphilis and gonorrhoea, are on the rise in modern England, staging a comeback from the Victorian era. Over the past one year, there has been a 20 percent rise in the incidence of STIs. The rates of syphilis for example is on a 70 year high last year according to the Public Health England statistics.The PHE England published the figures and urged the local as well as national services to up their game in prevention and treatment of STIs. The report states that there were a total of 7,137 new cases of syphilis in 2017 and this is a 20 percent rise from the year before. This number is the largest since 1949 the report says. Highest incidence is seen among adults aged between 25 and 34 years and they were one third of all the cases. The next highest incidence was seen among those aged between 35 and 44 years. The report adds that 78 percent cases were seen in men who had had unprotected sex with men. Gonorrhea too is on the rise with a 22 percent increase in the number of cases in 2017. PHE England calls this rise as “concerning”. This is mainly because gonorrhoea strains that are affecting people are becoming increasingly resistant to the antibiotics that are at hand. In March 2018 for example a man was admitted with gonorrhoea that was highly resistant to the two types of antibiotics that this bacteria is most sensitive to. The man had travelled to south-east Asia from where he could have got the infection. Since then the PHE has directed GPs to refer the suspected cases of gonorrhoea they encounter to specialist sexual health services (SHS).Related StoriesFDA grants clearance to Hologic’s assay for detection of common sexually transmitted infectionsSedentary behavior costly to both public health and the public purseGonorrhoea may be transmitted via kissingThere has been a rise of 3 percent in SHS attendance between 2016 and 2017 (3.2 million in 2016 and 3.3 million in 2017). The numbers have risen by 13 percent in the last five years says the report. Councillor Izzi Seccombe, chairwoman of the Local Government Association’s Community Wellbeing Board said in a statement that this major rise in attendances to the SHS has put a strain on the resources. She said, “There is no time for complacency… Unless greater recognition and funding is given to councils to invest in prevention services, a reversal in the encouraging and continuing fall in STIs is now a real risk. Health inequalities will remain and councils may be unable to respond effectively to unforeseen outbreaks.” She called on the government to reverse the cuts to the councils so that they can meet the rising requirements.On the other, there has been a reduction in number of cases of chlamydia infection by 8 percent. According to the PHE, most of this decline has been seen in the SHS where testing for chlamydia has come down by 61 percent since 2015. They speculate that this reduction is not due to reduction in incidence of the infection but lack of testing. The recommendations state that all young women should be tested for chlamydia when they access contraception. The recommendations also emphasize on high-quality relationships and sex education at schools.According to Dr Gwenda Hughes, consultant scientist and head of the STI section at PHE, the long term health consequences of STIs are many. She explains that there is a high risk of infertility, pelvic inflammatory disease and danger to the unborn babies. The risk is to self as well as to present and future sexual partners she explained. She said that there should be consistent and correct use of condoms with new and casual sexual partners as well as regular check-ups and testing to determine and treat these infections early. Treponema pallidum Syphilis bacterium, the bacterium responsible for the dangerous sexually transmitted infection syphilis. Image Credit: Royaltystockphoto.com / Shutterstocklast_img read more


Federal judge enters consent decree against Minnesota dairy farm for selling adulterated

first_imgJul 11 2018U.S. District Judge Wilhelmina M. Wright for the District of Minnesota entered a consent decree of permanent injunction against Todd & Patty Meech Dairy Farm of Sebeka, Minn., and the farm’s owners, Todd Meech and Patty Meech, for introducing adulterated meat into interstate commerce and for failing to comply with federal requirements for administering drugs to food-producing animals.The consent decree prohibits the defendants from delivering animals and meat from the animals into the food supply, and from administering animal drugs to their animals, unless they meet certain requirements. These requirements include, but are not limited to, establishing and implementing systems that prevent the sale or distribution of any animals whose edible tissues contain animal drugs in amounts above the levels permitted by law, and having systems in place for establishing and maintaining better drug inventory and animal identification records. The FDA must also inspect and certify in writing that Meech Dairy Farm is in compliance with all applicable regulations before it can resume business operations related to meat production. The permanent injunction, however, does not prohibit the farm from selling milk since there was no evidence that the farm’s milk was adulterated.”It’s critical that animal producers take the necessary steps to ensure that their food is safe for people to eat, and this includes following the instructions on a drug’s label when treating an animal to ensure that no harmful drug residues are left in the animal’s tissues,” said Steven Solomon, D.V.M., director of the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine. “When an animal producer puts animals’ and people’s health at risk, we will take action to protect the public. American consumers should have confidence in the safety of the meat they eat.”Related StoriesReplacing a small amount of red meat with healthier foods may improve life expectancyArtificial DNA can help release active ingredients from drugs in sequenceAlcohol, Cannabis and Other Drugs: A Pharmacological EvaluationMeech Dairy Farm has approximately 500 cattle and sells milk and cows for slaughter for use as food. Meech Dairy Farm has a long history of violations. During several inspections, the FDA observed that the defendants failed to maintain adequate treatment records for their cattle, including the dosage of drugs administered and the date on which the animal could safely go to slaughter or be milked. The FDA most recently inspected Meech Dairy Farm from Dec.14, 2016 through March 20, 2017, after the United States Department of Agriculture informed the FDA of its finding of sulfadimethoxine residue – an antibiotic – in one of the farm’s cows that was above the limit legally allowed, which had been sold for slaughter on June 28, 2016.As part of the approval for a drug intended for use in a food-producing species, the FDA evaluates the safety of drug residues that may result from such use and establishes a tolerance, which is the level of a drug residue legally allowed to be in food products derived from treated animals. Drug residue levels that are at or below the tolerance are safe for human consumption.The FDA also establishes milk discard times and withdrawal times, the length of time that must be observed after an animal is administered a drug and before it can be milked or sent to slaughter. When these human food safety precautions aren’t followed, it can pose a health risk to consumers.According to the complaint filed with the consent decree, the defendants violated the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act because they sold cattle for slaughter that had levels of animal drugs in their edible tissues that exceeded the tolerance established in the FDA’s regulations.The U.S. Department of Justice filed the complaint on behalf of the FDA. Source:https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm612998.htmlast_img read more


Study highlights potential of fetal gene therapy to prevent lethal neurodegenerative disease

first_imgJul 16 2018A fatal neurodegenerative condition known as Gaucher disease can be prevented in mice following fetal gene therapy, finds a new study led by UCL, the KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital and National University Health System in Singapore.The study, published today in Nature Medicine, highlights the potential of fetal gene therapy to prevent and cure neonatal lethal neurodegenerative diseases in humans in utero.Gaucher disease is an irreversible, inherited genetic metabolic disorder that results from not having enough glucocerebrosidase (GCase) – an enzyme that breaks down fatty chemicals called glucocerebrosides (GBA). Because the body cannot break down this chemical, the fat-laden Gaucher cells build up in the spleen, liver, bone marrow, and nervous system, causing bone disease, anaemia, fatigue, eye problems, seizures, and brain damage.Mutations in the GBA gene, which encodes the GCase enzyme that is deficient in Gaucher disease, are also a risk factor for Parkinson’s disease.”Although the symptoms of some mild forms of Gaucher disease can be treated postnatally, more severe forms that cause early-onset, irreversible neurodegeneration are currently untreatable and are often fatal in infants. Being able to provide therapy at the earliest possible opportunity is vital in treating the brain which has a limited capacity to regenerate,” explained senior author, Dr Ahad Rahim (UCL School of Pharmacy).Scientists used a viral vector to deliver genetic material into the brains of fetal mice carrying neuropathic Gaucher disease, caused by mutations in GBA. Mice who received the gene therapy exhibited less brain degeneration and survived considerably longer than untreated mice.”We found that the mice who received an injection of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector were more able to break down fatty chemicals and re-express the gene encoding an enzyme that is deficient in Gaucher disease,” said corresponding author, Dr Simon Waddingdon (UCL Institute for Women’s Health).”The mice who received the injection in utero, lived for up to at least 18 weeks after birth compared to 15 days in untreated mice and had no signs of neurodegeneration and were fertile and fully mobile. Neonatal intervention also rescued mice but less effectively.”Related StoriesNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellEMBL study reveals uncoupling between chromatin topology and gene expressionResearchers discover gene linked to healthy aging in wormsGiven the promising results shown in mice, the team from Singapore performed the test in non-human primates (NHP) at the early stages of pregnancy. This is the gestation when a clinical diagnosis of genetic conditions can be made, and when the immune system is more responsive to gene therapy. The research involved the use of NHPs due to their similarity to humans in the development of the central nervous system, and other organs, allowing for an accurate model to be achieved in fetal gene transfer.The team showed that the delivery of viral vectors to the developing brain is feasible using an established clinical approach that resulted in the distribution of the transgene to the developing brain.”Macaques and humans share a very similar neurological, immunological and physiological developmental time-line in the womb, making them accurate models for pre-clinical investigations before clinical trials can proceed. We have used a clinically relevant method to deliver the GBA gene using AAV vectors to the brain efficiently.”This new approach will bring hope, not only for Gaucher disease, but also for other inborn errors of metabolism that can potentially be treated using fetal gene therapy,” said Associate Professor Jerry Chan, Senior Consultant, Department of Reproductive Medicine, KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital.The team, which also involved scientists from King’s College London, Imperial College London, the University of Oxford and an international team of researchers, are now engaged with Apollo Therapeutics in developing gene therapy for Gaucher disease.Dan Brown, Chairman of the Gauchers Association added, “The Association has been involved as part of this project from a very early stage providing the initial grant to which allowed them to begin their research and are delighted to hear of the promising results published today.” Source:https://www.singhealth.com.sg/last_img read more


British Heart Foundation launches unique £30 million global cardiovascular challenge

first_imgWe’ve made great progress over the last 60 years in understanding and tackling many heart and circulatory diseases, and I am proud that BHF-funded research has made a substantial contribution to this success. But heart and circulatory diseases remain a major health problem worldwide, still causing 1 in 3 deaths globally.The time is right for a radical approach. With recent advances in areas all the way from genome editing to artificial intelligence, we have an unprecedented opportunity to exploit new ways of doing research that moves beyond incremental gains and accelerates breakthroughs.This will be one of the largest awards of its kind. It is without borders and without boundaries. The winning project will be truly transformative, and something that simply couldn’t happen without funding on this scale. The ideas can tackle any heart or circulatory condition using any approach. All we ask is that you think big.” Aug 29 2018British Heart Foundation to tackle the suffering and devastation caused by heart and circulatory diseases with historic research awardThe British Heart Foundation (BHF) is today launching the Big Beat Challenge, a unique research funding award that will bring together world-leading researchers and innovators to identify and solve any of the biggest problems in heart and circulatory disease.Unveiled at this year’s European Society of Cardiology Congress in Munich, the £30 million award will be one of the largest and most ambitious of its kind; a challenge to scientists, clinicians, innovators and entrepreneurs to look beyond incremental gains and accelerate breakthroughs that could transform lives across the globe.For more than half a century, BHF-funded researchers have pioneered world-leading efforts to understand the causes of heart and circulatory diseases and develop new methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Despite huge progress, the burden of heart and circulatory diseases continues to rise. Around the world, 18 million people die from heart and circulatory diseases each year. The WHO expects this to rise to 23 million by 2030.The Big Beat Challenge will push the international research community to identify a real world challenge, significant unmet need or opportunity for game-changing innovation in heart and circulatory science or medicine. A problem or opportunity, which if solved or seized at scale, would mean major progress towards real patient benefit.Proposals must be transformative, clinically relevant, and with a multi-disciplinary approach that couldn’t be done without funding on this scale. Ideas could transform the lives of a few, or provide a smaller but important change for many.Related StoriesNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerWeightlifting is better for the heart than cardioStudy explores role of iron in over 900 diseasesThe winning team can come from any country, sector or discipline, working on a scale above and beyond traditional research schemes to achieve a truly revolutionary breakthrough in any heart or circulatory disease.The BHF is assembling an international, multi-disciplinary, expert advisory panel to oversee the Big Beat Challenge. A call for outline applications will open at the end of 2018 and close in mid-2019. Shortlisted applications with the most promising ideas will be given seed funding, and teams will then have around six months to develop their final proposals. These full applications will then be peer-reviewed and the winning research programme recommended by the panel.Professor Sir Nilesh Samani, Medical Director at the BHF: Source:https://www.bhf.org.uk/last_img read more


Internet and telephoneassisted parental training decreases likelihood of child disruptive behavior

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 4 2018Increasing evidence highlights the value of identifying children at risk in the community earlyPositive long-term outcomes, such as a reduction in child disruptive behavior and increased parental skills, have been reported in a new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP). For a large number of families, screened from the general population, internet- and telephone-assisted trainings that target disruptive behavior in children at age 4 decreases the likelihood of such disruptive behavior occurring. The program was effective 24 months after initiation.Preschool children with disruptive behavior show significant functional impairment at home, daycare, school and in community settings. A number of studies have shown that this type of behavior has untoward, long-term, harmful consequences, including mental and physical health problems, crime, substance abuse, and increased risk of suicidality later in life. Untreated disruptive behavior disorders are some of the most costly early childhood psychiatric disorders. Parent training is one of the most effective approaches for the psychosocial treatment of disruptive behavioral problems in young children. However, no previous Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) has been conducted on an intervention offering remote or internet-assisted parental training and population-based screening. This study reports on two-year outcomes from preschool children with disruptive behavioral problems who were randomized to receive either an 11-week internet-assisted parental training or an educational control condition. The study is unique, in part, due to its use of a population-based screening to facilitate enrollment and due to its long-term follow-up period with an assessment at 24 months which had a very low attrition rate.Altogether, 730 of the 4,656 four-year-old children who attended annual child health clinic check-ups in Southwest Finland met the criteria for high level disruptive behavioral problems. 464 parents participated in the 11-week Strongest Families Smart Website (SFSW) intervention program, or an educational control (EC) group. When the SFSW and EC groups were compared between baseline and after the 24-month follow-up, the primary outcome of the Child Behavior Check List (CBCL) externalizing score showed significantly higher improvements in the SFSW group (effect size 0.22; p<0.001). In addition, most of the child psychopathology measures, including aggression, sleep problems, anxiety, and other emotional problems decreased significantly more in the SFSW group than in the EC group. Similarly, parental skills increased more in the SFSW group than in the EC group.Related StoriesResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down's syndromeResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairNew therapeutic food boosts key growth-promoting gut microbes in malnourished childrenInterestingly, children in the SFSW group made significantly less use of child mental health services than the EC group during the 24-month follow-up period (17.5 percent vs. 28.0 percent)."Our findings address some key public health challenges in delivering parent training programs" says lead author Andre Sourander, MD, PhD, of the University of Turku, Finland, and leader of the research group."When traditional parental training requires referral to clinical services, it often results in substantial delays, and older children are more likely to require adjunctive treatment to parental training. Studies have identified that internet-assisted treatment programs may offer certain benefits over traditional interventions: these include high levels of support; greater accessibility; convenience; and reduced costs. Studying feasibility and effectiveness of digitalized child mental health interventions is important because of the global shortage of skilled staff who can address child mental health problems."According to Dr. Sourander, the parents were highly motivated and continued their involvement in the training program. Most importantly, the treatment effects were maintained until two years. Identifying children at risk in the community at an early stage enabled local government services to provide an effective parent training program for a large number of families, including many who would not have participated in clinic-based services.Source: https://www.elsevier.com/about/press-releases/research-and-journals/internet-and-telephone-assisted-parent-training-intervention-for-child-disruptive-behavior-was-effective-in-two-year-follow-uplast_img read more


Study aims to understand role of clopidogrel in patients with cardiovascular disease

first_img Source:http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cscript/cvia/2018/00000003/00000002/art00005 Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 11 2018In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 2, 2018, pp. 149-162(14); DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0049 Punag Divanji and Kendrick Shunk from the University of California San Francisco and The San Francisco Veteran Affairs Hospital, San Francisco, CA, USA consider when clopidogrel is the right choice in modern antiplatelet therapy.Related StoriesIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyStudy: Two-thirds of pneumonia patients receive more antibiotics than they probably needBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryPlatelet inhibition with aspirin is the cornerstone of medical therapy for coronary artery disease. In the era of percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stents, dual anti-platelet therapy with the addition of clopidogrel (Plavix©, Bristol-Myers Squibb, New York, NY) became the mainstay of therapy. However, with the advent of newer oral antiplatelet medications, including prasugrel (Effient©, Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, Indiana) and ticagrelor (Brilinta©, Astra-Zeneca, Cambridge, United Kingdom), choosing the appropriate platelet inhibitor has become more nuanced. The optimal regimen differs based on patient characteristics, clinical situation, and the condition being treated, with differing risk and safety profiles for these medications. The authors explore the appropriate use of antiplatelet therapy for stable ischemic heart disease, acute coronary syndrome, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease. They evaluate the data behind the use of antiplatelet therapy in patients on oral anticoagulation. By understanding the biochemistry of platelet aggregation, the pharmacology of platelet inhibitors, and the extensive clinical trial data that informs current guideline recommendations the authors aim to better understand the role of clopidogrel in patients with cardiovascular disease.last_img read more


Research chimps to be listed as endangered

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emailcenter_img “That was a well-intentioned decision, but now we realize it was a mistake,” Ashe said. “What we actually did was encourage a culture that treats these animals as a commodity.”When USFWS reviewed its policy, it concluded that the ESA does not allow for a split designation. It also found that giving the estimated 1750 chimps in captivity a less protected status could create a way to “launder” wild chimps as captive ones, and that the split status had done little to reduce the threat to wild chimpanzees.Under the new designation, which goes into effect on 14 September, anyone working with captive chimps in the United States must apply for a permit from USFWS. Permits, Ashe said, will be required for the sale and import of these animals, as well as for “any activities that are likely to result in stress or harm.” Organizations that want to continue working with chimpanzees will have to document that the work enhances the survival of the species and benefits chimps in the wild. That could include research that boosts habitat restoration or contributes to improved management. “We have been working closely with the NIH [National Institutes of Health] and the biomedical research community to make sure they understand the implications of our final rule,” Ashe said. “If anyone is actively engaged in chimpanzee research, they should apply for a permit now.”Ashe said some biomedical research with chimps may be allowed to continue if it is critical for understanding human disease. “But the entity would have to make a [monetary] contribution or support conservation of wild chimpanzees.”“This is a very exciting day,” Goodall said at the press conference. “It’s been a struggle to think of the chimpanzees exploited in medical research.” She has begun referring to chimps as “chimpanzee beings” instead of as “animals” and says the decision “shows an awakening, a new consciousness.”HSUS also applauded the move. “We are extremely pleased with this momentous decision and look forward to getting more chimpanzees out of laboratories and into sanctuaries,” says Kathleen Conlee, the organization’s vice president of animal research issues. “We were sending the wrong message by using these animals so readily for research, entertainment, and as pets.” She says that even if the new status doesn’t completely end research on chimpanzees, the permitting process will make public all the work being done with these animals in pharmaceutical companies and other private research labs, which have not been subject to NIH scrutiny. “We hope this compels private labs to start thinking about sanctuaries for these animals.” The USFWS decision comes on the heels of an NIH announcement in 2013 that it would phase out most government-funded chimpanzee research and retire the majority of its research chimps. “This is an incredible one-two punch,” said HSUS President Wayne Pacelle, who was also part of the press conference.Susan Larson, an anatomist at Stony Brook University in New York who has worked with lab chimps for decades, says the USFWS announcement adds yet another hurdle to studying these animals. “We already have to apply for grants, get institutional approval, and be subject to regular inspections,” she says. “This is going to make it increasingly difficult to get these projects off the ground.”David Johnson says that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Johnson is the vice president of Cascades Biosciences Consultants Inc., which consults on biomedical research involving animals, and he has spent much of his career working with chimpanzees, including being the project director of the NIH’s Chimpanzee Management Plan and studying the animals to develop a hepatitis vaccine. “The chimpanzee is no longer an essential model in biomedical research,” he says. Still, he believes that some cognitive and other studies with chimps will continue. “This research will require some further justification, but I’m supportive of Fish and Wildlife’s decision,” he says. “I think it’s the right thing to do.” The presence of Jane Goodall was a giveaway. In a press conference today that featured the famed primatologist, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announced that it will classify all captive chimpanzees as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The move gives captive chimps the same status as their wild counterparts, ending an odd split designation, and could deal a significant blow to biomedical research involving the animals. More than 700 chimps are involved in research in U.S. labs today.“This decision will help us ensure that the world we pass along to our children and grandchildren will be filled with chimpanzees,” said USFWS Director Dan Ashe at the press conference. “We believe this action will ensure that activities affecting all chimpanzees will contribute to the survival of chimpanzees in the wild.”USFWS has been considering the status change since a coalition of animal organizations—including the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and the Jane Goodall Institute—petitioned it in 2010. The group claimed that research chimps were treated inhumanely and that the animals were too cognitively advanced to be kept in captivity. It also argued that USFWS had erred when, in 1990, it first listed wild chimpanzees as endangered but made the unusual move to keep captive chimps—including those used in research, zoos, and entertainment—listed as threatened. (All chimps earned that designation in 1976 due to threats from poaching, disease, and capture for research.) No other species has this split status, and USFWS hoped at the time that propagating chimps in captivity would reduce the need to take them from the wild. It also received pressure from the biomedical research community, which feared that an endangered listing would compromise HIV research and other important studies.  last_img read more


California gas leak doubled methane emissions in LA basin

first_imgCombatting climate change is a vexing challenge because greenhouse gases belch from billions of cars, cows, and coal-burners. But sometimes lone offenders rise far above the rest. On 23 October 2015, officials reported an ongoing leak at SS25, a well in a massive underground natural gas storage facility near Los Angeles, California. Researchers collected air samples from daily flights over the region from 7 November 2015 through 13 February, 2 days after the leak was capped. In today’s Science they report that—every hour after the blast—the facility released up to 60 metric tons of methane, the primary component of natural gas and the greenhouse gas with the second biggest overall climate impact. The leak was so massive that it essentially doubled the methane emissions for the entire Los Angeles basin, and had the same climate impact in annual greenhouse gas emissions as 572,000 cars.last_img read more


Top stories A 400yearold shark smashing a famous science hoax and more

first_img Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Imagine having to wait a century to have sex. Such is the life of the Greenland shark—a 5-meter-long predator that may live more than 400 years, according to a recent study, making it the longest lived vertebrate by at least a century. So it should come as no surprise that the females are not ready to reproduce until after they hit their 156th birthday.A bit of cash can keep someone off the streets for 2 years or moreIf someone is about to become homeless, giving them a single cash infusion, averaging about $1000, may be enough to keep them off the streets for at least 2 years. That’s the conclusion of a new study, which finds that programs that proactively assist those in need don’t just help the victims—they may benefit society as a whole.U.S. science groups have 20 questions for candidatesA coalition of 56 higher education and scientific organizations has come up with 20 questions whose answers could help voters choose from among Democrat Hillary Clinton, Republican Donald Trump, the Green Party’s Jill Stein, and Libertarian Gary Johnson.Chemists to get preprint server of their ownCall it a chain reaction. Following the leads of the physics, mathematics, economics, and biology communities, the American Chemical Society announced yesterday that it will start a preprint server for chemistry papers, tentatively titled ChemRxiv.Now that you’ve got the scoop on this week’s hottest Science news, come back Monday to test your smarts on our weekly quiz! Mutation that made it easier to ride horses evolved more than 1000 years agoSitting in the saddle can still be a bumpy ride, but things got a lot smoother nearly 12 centuries ago, when a single genetic mutation arising in the medieval United Kingdom and Iceland gave horses their ability to “amble,” or walk with a relatively smooth, four-beat rhythm versus a bumpier, more erratic pattern.Greenland shark may live 400 years, smashing longevity recordlast_img read more


This alligatorlike fish sucks—at lightning speeds

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Alex FoxMar. 6, 2019 , 5:45 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) This alligatorlike fish sucks—at lightning speedscenter_img Email With a long, broad snout filled to the brim with flesh-piercing teeth, the alligator gar, a 3-meter-long freshwater fish, is easy to mistake for its reptilian namesake. What’s less obvious is that this toothy creature has been patrolling the bayous and rivers of North America virtually unchanged for tens of millions of years. Now, paleontologists have taken advantage of that long history to gain insights into how its ancient relatives might have snapped, sucked, and engulfed their food.First, researchers used high-speed cameras to record 17 young alligator gar feeding in the lab and study the mechanics of their ferocious bite. The team also used x-ray scans of the fish’s head (above) to create a 3D model of its skull that was used to visualize the movements of the jaw bones during feeding.The researchers assumed their study would be an open-and-shut case—the alligator gar was thought to capture prey simply by slamming its jaws shut. But they found something surprising: The gar also creates powerful suction at lightning speed (42 milliseconds) with tightly choreographed movements of bones in its skull and shoulder, according to research posted last week on the bioRxiv preprint server. Those complex skull and jaw movements suggest a new feeding mechanism not only for the prehistoric-looking gar, but also its genuinely prehistoric relatives, scientists say. This can help fish biologists figure out how and what the modern gar eats—and paleontologists imagine how similar extinct species might have fed. What’s more, this deeper understanding of how a living fossil moves could help reconstruct similar motions in ancient species—and allow computers to reanimate actual fossil bones.last_img read more


Were Europes megalithic societies patrilineal

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Paleogenomicist Federico Sánchez-Quinto from Uppsala University in Sweden used these techniques on dozens of remains from four megalithic tombs in Ireland, Scotland, and Sweden that were first uncovered years ago. He and his team sequenced the nuclear genomes of those remains—most of which have been dated to between 4500 B.C.E. and 3000 B.C.E.The remains represented 18 men and six women. When the researchers looked for strings of genetic code that would indicate how closely the buried individuals were related, they found close kinships among men at the Scottish and Swedish sites. And at one of two Irish sites, Primrose Grange on the country’s northwestern coast, at least six of the nine men, who spanned up to 12 generations, shared a genetic variant, suggesting they descended from the same paternal line. One man is likely the father of a 5500-year-old body found at another megalithic site just 2 kilometers to the west.Some anthropologists think burial in these monumental sites was likely a mark of high social status. The authors argue that, taken together, those results suggest European megalithic societies at the time were patrilineal, with social power invested in the male line across multiple generations, they report today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.The findings are intriguing, says Thomas Kador, an archaeologist at University College London. He notes that even though men were more commonly interred in these sites, the women there seem to have been given identical burials. That suggests to him that even if these societies were patrilineal, women still played significant roles. Kador’s team has also done a separate genome-wide analysis of ancient individuals at a different megalithic site in Ireland and found a notable lack of close kinship among the buried. It’s possible that different megalithic societies on the island had very different social structures and funerary practices, he says.Indeed, Robert Hensey, an archaeologist at the National University of Ireland in Galway, warns against drawing such sweeping conclusions about the many and varied Neolithic societies of northern and western Europe from a handful of sites and a few dozen people. “It strains credulity.” Archaeologists have long been fascinated by the megalithic burial grounds scattered across northern Europe, including those at the most famous site, Stonehenge. But although these stone monuments have yielded scores of ancient remains, they aren’t good at giving up another secret: how the people buried there were related. Now, a controversial study using new DNA sequencing technology has revealed that, in at least four sites in Ireland, Scotland, and Sweden, the interred men were closely related, suggesting to some a patrilineal society.“It is without any doubt an interesting paper,” says Bettina Schulz Paulsson, a prehistoric archaeologist at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden who specializes in megalith origins. But, she adds, the numbers of sites and bodies “are far too little” to know the social structures of these early communities.For decades, archaeologists have exhumed ancient remains at megalithic sites, from Carnac in the Brittany region of France to Sweden’s Ale’s Stones. In recent years, researchers have managed to coax mitochondrial DNA from some skeletons, revealing links down the female line that shed light—not on familial relations—but on early migration patterns. (Mitochondrial DNA is passed only from mothers to their children.) Recent improvements to DNA sequencing technology and statistical and collection methods have made it possible to sequence ancient nuclear DNA, which can also reveal relationships between male relations. Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Archaeologists excavate stone tombs at Ireland’s Primrose Grange. By Michael PriceApr. 15, 2019 , 3:15 PM Were Europe’s megalithic societies patrilineal? Göran Burenhult last_img read more


Sailor in the Famous WWII Kissing Photograph Dies at 95

first_imgThe American sailor famously photographed kissing a stranger in New York’s Times Square to celebrate the end of World War Two on VJ Day has died at the age of 95. The picture of George Mendonsa bending over and kissing 21-year-old Greta Zimmer Friedman became one of the most iconic images of the period. “It’s probably the most popular photo that Life ever published,” a photo editor for the magazine’s company told CNN.Mendonsa’s daughter, Sharon Molleu, told the Providence Journal that her father fell and had a seizure early on February 17th at the assisted living facility in Middletown, Rhode Island, where he lived with his wife of 70 years. He died just two days before his 96th birthday.Unconditional Surrender is a three-dimensional interpretation of a photo taken by Alfred Eisenstaedt of a sailor kissing a nurse in Times Square, New York City on August 14, 1945, following the announcement of V-J Day.George Mendonsa was born on February 19, 1923, in Newport; his parents were immigrants from Portugal. His father was a fisherman, and George dropped out of high school before he enlisted in the Navy in 1942. He served as a quartermaster on USS The Sullivans, a destroyer in the Pacific.According to the New York Times, “He was steering the ship in 1945 when an aircraft carrier was struck by kamikaze fighters, and he had to help more than 100 American sailors floating in the water reach a nearby hospital ship, where he saw nurses caring for the badly wounded.”“I believe from that day on I had a soft spot for nurses,” Mendonsa said in an interview in 2005.Jorgensen’s similar photographOn August 14, 1945, World War II was declared won in the United States as news of the Japanese surrender spread. Thousands of people flooded New York City’s Times Square, including Mendonsa, who was on leave, and a 21-year-old nurse named Greta Zimmer Friedman.Related Video: 15 surprising facts about WW2 you might not have known:“I saw a nurse,” Mendonsa said later. “It was just instinct, I guess. I went and I grabbed her.”Also on the spot was Life photographer Alfred Eisenstadt, who was scrambling to capture the joy that seized the city.George Mendonsa and Greta Friedman, guests of honor at the Bristol, Rhode Island, July 4th parade in 2009. Photo by Josh23 CC BY-SA 3.0The photographer described how he watched the sailor running along the street, grabbing any girl in sight.“I was running ahead of him with my Leica looking back over my shoulder but none of the pictures that were possible pleased me,” he wrote in the book Eisenstadt on Eisenstadt. “Then suddenly, in a flash, I saw something white being grabbed. I turned around and clicked the moment the sailor kissed the nurse. If she had been dressed in a dark dress, I would never have taken the picture.”George Mendonsa, holds one of the most iconic photographs of the 20th century. Photo by Patrick Raycraft/Hartford Courant/MCT via Getty ImagesFriedman, who at the time was working as a dental assistant, said she had not been aware of the existence of the photo until the 1960s.“It wasn’t much of a kiss,” she later recalled. “It was just somebody celebrating. It wasn’t a romantic event. It was his jubilance that he didn’t have to go back.”The photographer, in the chaos of the moment, did not get the names of the couple in his photograph. Many different people have claimed to be both the man and the woman kissing, but it is believed that Mendonsa and Friedman were the two in question.San Diego, California USA – May 27, 2018: Tourists visit Unconditional Surrender Statues and USS Midway Museum in San Diego, CaliforniaMendonsa’s new girlfriend, Rita Petry, supposedly saw the kiss happen but said later she did not mind. They married in 1946, after Mendonsa was discharged, and he returned to professional fishing.Read another story from us: The surprising truth behind the classic V-J Day photo of a sailor passionately embracing a nurseAlthough some have criticized the photo in recent years as showing an assault, Friedman disagreed. She told The Navy Times in 2012 that the day was so momentous that she empathized with Mendonsa’s excitement. “I can’t think of anybody who considered that as an assault,” she said. “It was a happy event.”last_img read more